digitalrecordersreview.org showcases the music, dances, language practices, & customs of African Americans and of other people of Black descent throughout the world.




You are watching: You get no respect in here cheer

Uploaded by MrFierce06 on Nov 20, 2008The words to that cheer are a good example of the aggressively bragging spirit of many stomp n shake cheers:"You ain"t bad, you ain"t tough, the eagles will rock your stuff".Another NCCU video on YouTube is titled "Thug Passion" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTBAk8TX3kU. In that video, that cheerleading squad doesn"t chant, or perform any cheer routines. Instead, they do cheer dancing (performing dance-like movements to the accompaniment of the university"s band). It"s unlikely that any mainstream cheerleader squad would perform such a routine, let alone title it "Thug Passion".-Azizi Powell (writing under the facebook name "cocojams jambalayah", with additional comments), July 2011COMMENT #2..."Re my statement that stomp n shake cheerleaders rarely smile, the "We Are The Trojans" cheer is an example of stomp n shake cheerleaders smiling. Olympic high cheerleaders 09-10Uploaded by batay1978 on Feb 17, 2010we are the trojans and we are h-o-t- hot we keep it goin and we just dont stop-snip-It seems to me that if the cheer is one in which the squad is bragging on themselves, then it would fit the spirit of the cheer if some of the cheerleaders if all of the cheerleaders smile. But if it’s a "battle cheer" (a confrontational cheer in which the squad may "brag on" their team or their squad, but mostly confront/put down their opponent squad and/or team), then smiling wouldn"t fit. Also, it seems to me that "bragging on their squad" and, chanting about how other squads steal their cheers, are two other ways that stomp n shake cheerleading is different from mainstream cheerleading where the focus is on the athlete team, and/or the university (school) and not the cheerleading squad itself." -Azizi Powell (writing under the facebook name "cocojams jambalayah"), August 2011COMMENT #3"Here"s my response to your question "doesn"t anybody else see this as a perhaps subtle but still persistent way of categorizing and stereotyping black culture as being aggressive (oh, and thus even contributing to the classic stereotype of black people possessing a sexualized aggression/aggressive sexuality)?" :Stomp & shake cheerleading is a performance art that includes dramatic role playing. It isn"t meant to convey how those cheerleaders always express themselves every moment of every day, in any & all contexts.Instead of attempting to understand the roles & meanings of a particular cultural element within the context of a particular culture, and the values given to that particular cultural element by that particular culture, people who are ignorant about that culture, including people who have ulterior motives such racists and/or sexists, attach their own roles & meanings to those cultural elements that they pinpoint. People from a particular culture aren"t responsible for how people outside of their culture define, interpret, or evaluate what they value, or what they say or do.

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Furthermore, people from a particular culture not only don"t have to accept but shouldn"t accept without questions or consideration the definitions, interpretations, or evaluations that have been given to their culture as a whole, and/or to specific elements of that culture from persons outside of their culture (or, for that matter, from individuals or groups within their own culture).Even if that culture also defines those words and/or behaviors as "aggressive" and/or "sexualized", and even if there are multiple elements within that particular culture of "aggressive" and/or "sexualized" words and behaviors, those elements may not mean the same things and/or may not have the same values within that culture as they have outside of that culture. Also, identifying elements of aggressive performances or sexualized performances within a particular Black culture or within several or all Black culure, doesn"t mean that the stereotypes about Black people as hyper aggressive and/or hyper sexualized are true for all Black people in all contexts.-Azizi Powell (writing under the facebook name "cocojams jambalayah"), March 2012****WORDS TO VIDEO #1Here are the words to the VSU Woo Woos - "Work It" video which is posted at the top of this page:WORK ITV-S-U let"s work itAyeee yee yeeWork itAyyeee yee yeeTrojans know how we doGet out ya seats and work Big BlueAhhhhh work itAyeeee yee yee-GoTrojans on Sep 11, 2008 ****Click http://digitalrecordersreview.org/2011/10/weighty-subject-being-thick-in-african.html for another post from this blog on stomp & shake cheerleading.****Thanks for visiting digitalrecordersreview.org.Viewer comments are welcome.