I had actually originally assumed it to be a type of scat singing (gibberish) but an older ireland friend said it's infact gaelic.

You are watching: Musha rain dum a doo, dum a da

A cursory google search turns up

Musha rain dum a doo, dum a da Whack for my daddy, oh Whack because that my daddy, five There's whiskey in the jar, oh

But this feel a little bit like a voice transliteration.

(https://youtu.be/hlWTASnnft4?t=26)

(https://youtu.be/5FcnQ2DleMw?t=74)

(https://youtu.be/Yfwjoztf2Dk?t=37)

If friend can provide me one idea of exactly how the lyrics translate I'd it is in greatful. Many thanks much!


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level 1
· 4y · edited 4y
Gaeilge Native
Musha = The Irish civilization muise. Frequently used together an exclamation the doesn't really median anything.

In this context it would typical "Well." Again not really an interpretation anything. The remainder of that is simply musical "nonsense" typical in Irish classic music.

The definition of muise have the right to differ in different contexts. Someone can tell friend something and also if you replied "muise", relying on your inflection, you might be communicating any kind of of a variety of things.

Also FYI, generally the language is described as Irish as soon as speaking in English and also Irish speakers refer to it as Gaeilge, when speaking Irish. Gaelic is actually a branch of Celtic languages that consists of Irish, Scottish Gaelic and also Manx.


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level 2
· 4y
, ES, DE, EN, TLH (Klingon)

Also FYI, frequently the language is referred to as Irish as soon as speaking in English and also Irish speakers describe it as Gaeilge, as soon as speaking Irish. Gaelic is in reality a branch the Celtic language that consists of Irish, Scottish Gaelic and also Manx.

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This has always thrown me for a little bit of a loop. It's "Irish", no "Irish Gaelic"; yet it's "Scottish Gaelic", not "Scottish". Speakers of both usage a cognate the "Gaelic" (Gaeilge, Gàidhlig) when speaking their corresponding languages, and yet never ever use "Gaelic" alone in English.


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